Saturday, July 27, 2013
The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, a set on Flickr.The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things is an exhibition running at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea, curated by Mark Leckey: it examines the links between modern technology and ancient symbolism. It’s an eclectic mix of works which uses often startling juxtapositions of objects and ideas - a modern robot hand next to a reliquary, a diesel engine sparkling in copper sulphate crystals, a death mask of William Blake next to a cyberman.
The problem for the photographer is obviously shooting hand-held in very low light - some of these were shot at ISO 3200 and even then it was difficult to avoid camera shake.  All - apart from the wider Minotoaur image - were shot with Helios 44-M 58mm f2 lens mounted on an Olympus E-PL1.
The exhibition runs until OctoberVia Flickr:
An exhibition at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea, 26 July 2013.
The exhibition, curated by Mark Leckey, explores how new technologies draw on the heritage of the distant past.
Electronic hand and medieval reliquaryMinatour maquette (1)Minotaur maquette (2)Statuette

The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, a set on Flickr.

The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things is an exhibition running at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea, curated by Mark Leckey: it examines the links between modern technology and ancient symbolism. It’s an eclectic mix of works which uses often startling juxtapositions of objects and ideas - a modern robot hand next to a reliquary, a diesel engine sparkling in copper sulphate crystals, a death mask of William Blake next to a cyberman.

The problem for the photographer is obviously shooting hand-held in very low light - some of these were shot at ISO 3200 and even then it was difficult to avoid camera shake. All - apart from the wider Minotoaur image - were shot with Helios 44-M 58mm f2 lens mounted on an Olympus E-PL1.

The exhibition runs until October

Via Flickr:
An exhibition at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea, 26 July 2013.

The exhibition, curated by Mark Leckey, explores how new technologies draw on the heritage of the distant past.